Like so many during the early days of the pandemic, it was difficult to put what was happening into perspective.

To this day, few truly comprehend the destruction and devastation of life that took place between April 7 and May 7 in the United States — one of, if not, the darkest 31-day period(s) in U.S. history.

We often have great reverence for the major battles the United States has fought, so turning to the annals of history to put the daily death tolls we were witnessing play out in real time into perspective seemed logical.

What unfolded floored me.

According to Wikipedia, there were 24 battles that had 1,000 or more U.S. deaths and, for perspective, I added 9/11 to the list and adjusted all battles during the Civil War to account for the death counts on both sides:

• Gettysburg (7,058)

• Seven Days (5,228)

• Elsenborn Ridge (~5,000)

• Saint-Mihiel (~4,500)

• Spotsylvania (4,240)

• Chickamauga (3,968)

• Wilderness (3,741)

• Antietam (3,654)

• Shiloh (3,482)

• Chancellorsville (3,330)

• 2nd Bull Run (3,052)

• Stones River (3,024)

• Leyte Gulf (2,800)

• 9/11 (2,753)

• Cold Harbor (2,632)

• D-Day [first day] (2,500)

• Pearl Harbor (2,403)

• Battle of Aachen (2,000)

• Fredericksburg (1,892)

• Tarawa (1,759)

• Naval Battle of Guadalcanal (1,732)

• Task Force Faith (1,450)

• Savo Island (1,077)

• Belleau Wood (1,062)

• Manila (1,010)

Then, using worldometers.info, the daily death tolls from the pandemic gripping our nation between April 7 and May 7 were compared to the aforementioned battles.

Daily pandemic death tolls included:

• April 21 (2,744)

• April 15 (2,695)

• April 14 (2,633)

• April 17 (2,601)

• May 6 (2,582)

• April 28 (2,541)

• April 29 (2,458)

• April 22 (2,420)

• April 23 (2,413)

• May 5 (2,413)

• April 10 (2,283)

• April 30 (2,280)

• April 16 (2,255)

• April 7 (2,228)

• April 8 (2,212)

• May 7 (2,177)

• April 9 (2,151)

• April 25 (2,114)

• April 11 (2,070)

• April 24 (1,995)

• April 20 (1,990)

• May 1 (1,963)

• April 18 (1,925)

• April 12 (1,761)

• April 13 (1,749)

• May 2 (1,729)

• April 19 (1,599)

• April 17 (1,415)

• May 4 (1,346)

• April 26 (1,176)

• May 3 (1,176)

To put this in perspective, it took 178 days during the aforementioned battles — the 24 worst in U.S. history — to reach a cumulative death toll of 75,347 U.S. lives, which is an average of about 423 deaths per day, while during the current pandemic it took 31 days — all between April 7 and May 7 — to reach a death toll of 65,095, which is an average of about 2,100 deaths per day.

That’s staggering.

The sad truth is, unlike the battles which lasted days, the pandemic is still raging months later.

Albeit it did a slow burn during the summer months and early fall. However, since that time it has reignited the past few days with the second wave we were warned about from the start as the death tolls start to exponentially climb once again.

As of this writing, there were 1,615 new deaths posted Tuesday evening — the highest number since 1,853 were posted on July 30 — and as of this editing, there were 1,970 new deaths posted Wednesday evening — the highest number since 2,177 were posted on May 7 (which is when the time frame cited above ends) — and another 2,065 reported Thursday evening, bringing the cumulative death toll in this country to more than 258,000 since the pandemic reached our shores earlier this year.

John Sullivan is the sports editor at The Griffin Daily News.